You're viewing Docket Item 29 from the case WALLACE v. KOOLER ICE CORP. View the full docket and case details.

Download this document:




Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 1 of 8

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE  

MIDDLE DISTRICT OF GEORGIA 

MACON DIVISION 

 












 

 

 

 

CIVIL ACTION 
No. 5:11?CV?435 (CAR) 

 

LARRY WALLACE, 

Plaintiff, 

v. 

 

 

 

KOOLER ICE, CORP., 

Defendant. 
 

 

 

  
 

ORDER ON DEFENDANT’S PETITION FOR ATTORNEY’S FEES AND COSTS 

Before  the  Court  is  Defendant  Kooler  Ice,  Inc.’s  Petition  for  Attorney’s  Fees  and 

Costs  [Docs.  25  &  28]  upon  entry  of  final  judgment  in  the  above?captioned  case.    After 

carefully considering Defendant’s Petition, the record, and relevant authority, Defendant’s 

request is GRANTED IN PART AND DENIED IN PART.  Specifically, the Court grants 

Defendant’s request for reasonable expenses caused by Plaintiff Larry Wallace’s failure to 

obey  this  Court’s  Scheduling  and  Discovery  Order  [Doc.  19]  and  Order  to  Show  Cause 

[Doc. 22], pursuant to Rule 37(b)(2)(C).  However, the Court denies Defendant’s request 

for an award under Title VII, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e?5(k).  Defendant’s award is detailed below.  

BACKGROUND 

Plaintiff, proceeding pro se, filed a complaint against Defendant on October 31, 2011, 

asserting both race and age?based discrimination and retaliation claims under Title VII of 

the  Civil  Rights  Act  (“Title  VII”)  and  the  Age  Discrimination  in  Employment  Act 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 2 of 8

(“ADEA”).  In response, Defendant filed a pro se answer, “Counter Suit for Damages,” and 

a  motion  to  dismiss,  which  the  Court  struck  as  improper  submissions  by  a  corporation.  

Thereafter,  Defendant  obtained  representation  and  filed  a  proper  answer  on  March  27, 

2012,  raising  typical  defenses  to  Title  VII  and  ADEA  claims.    Defendant  did  not  file  a 

renewed motion to dismiss or pursue its initial “counter suit.”   

The parties submitted a proposed scheduling order on May 14, 2012.  For reasons 

unknown,  Plaintiff  severed  all  contact  with  both  Defendant  and  the  Court  shortly 

thereafter.  On August 3, 2012, the Court directed Plaintiff appear for a hearing on August 

16, 2012, and show cause why his case should not be dismissed for failure to prosecute.1   

Plaintiff failed to appear for the hearing, and the Court entered judgment dismissing this 

case without prejudice.  Now, Defendant seeks attorney’s fees and an assessment of costs 

and expenses under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(b)(2)(C) and Title VII, 42 U.S.C. § 

2000e?5(k).   Plaintiff has not responded to Defendant’s request.  

DISCUSSION 

 

In  its  Petition,  Defendant  requests  $3,867.50  in  attorney’s  fees,  representing  29.8 

hours of work.  Defendant also seeks $104.03 in miscellaneous costs and expenses.  The 

attorney’s fees are primarily attributable to two attorneys—a partner, Richard C. Foster, 

working  8.9  hours  at  $150.00  per  hour;  and  an  associate,  Andrea  Alexander  Guariglia, 

                                                            
1 While Defendant’s Petition obviously focuses on Plaintiff’s misconduct, the Court notes that it ordered the 
first show cause hearing in this case after Defendant failed to appear for a discovery conference on April 10, 
2012.  April 20, 2012 Order to Show Cause [Doc. 18]. 



 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 3 of 8

working  18.9  hours  at  $125.00  per  hour.    The  remaining  two  hours  represent  paralegal 

work by Cari Manton at $85.00 per hour.   

Defendant  provides  only  two  bases  for  its requested relief:    Federal  Rule  of  Civil 

Procedure 37(b)(2)(C) and Title VII, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e?5(k).  The Court addresses each of 

these in turn. 

I.

Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(b)(2)(C) 

Federal  Rule  of  Civil  Procedure  37  authorizes  the  Court  to  impose  a  variety  of 

sanctions  for  a  party’s  failure  “to  obey  an  order  to  provide  or  permit  discovery.”2  

Although  the  Court  enjoys  “broad  discretion  to  fashion  appropriate  sanctions  for 

violations  of  discovery  orders,”3    “the  [C]ourt  must  order  the  disobedient  party,  the 

attorney advising that party, or both to pay the reasonable expenses, including attorney’s 

fees, caused by the failure [to obey the Court’s order], unless the failure was substantially 

justified or other circumstances make an award of expenses unjust.”4  There are no such 

circumstances in this case. 

Because Plaintiff failed to meet his obligations under the Scheduling and Discovery 

Order [Doc. 19] and the Order to Show Cause [Doc. 22] for Plaintiff’s failure to participate 

in discovery, Defendant is entitled to recover reasonable attorney’s fees and costs caused 

by Plaintiff’s misconduct.  Plaintiff did not appear for his deposition on June 11, 2012, and 

                                                            
2 Fed. R. Civ. P. 37(b)(2)(A). 
3 Malautea v. Suzuki Motor Co., 987 F.2d 1536, 1542 (11th Cir. 1993). 
4 Fed. R. Civ. P. 37(b)(2)(C). 



 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 4 of 8

never  responded  to  Defendant’s  attempts  to  reschedule.    Moreover,  Plaintiff  failed  to 

supply his initial disclosures and did not respond to Defendant’s interrogatories, requests 

for  production,  and  requests  for  admissions.    These  actions  led  Defendant  to  expend 

additional resources to address Plaintiff’s non?compliance.5  Plaintiff’s utter disregard for 

Defendant’s  efforts  and  this  Court’s  orders  warrants  sanction,  which  “must  be  applied 

diligently” to penalize Plaintiff’s misconduct.6 

Having  found  Defendant  is  entitled  to  reasonable  attorney’s  fees  and  costs,  the 

Court must now determine an appropriate award.  To calculate the appropriate amount of 

attorney’s fees, the Court must establish the “lodestar” or the number of hours reasonably 

spent  working  on  the  case  multiplied  by  a  reasonable  hourly  rate.7    Once  the  Court 

determines the lodestar, it may adjust this amount for other considerations not factored in 

this calculation.8   

In computing the lodestar, the first step is to determine the reasonable hourly rate, 

which is defined as “the prevailing market rate in the relevant legal community for similar 

services  by  lawyers  of  reasonably  comparable  skills,  experience,  and  reputation.”9    In 

general,  the  relevant  legal  community  is  the  place  where  the  case  is  filed.10    The  Court 

further notes that it qualifies as an expert on the issue of hourly rates and may properly 
                                                            
5 Def. Exhibit C [Doc. 28?3]; Def. Invoices [Doc. 28?5]. 
6 See Roadway Exp., Inc. v. Piper, 447 U.S. 752, 763 (1980). 
7 See Norman v. Hous. Auth. of City of Montgomery, 836 F.2d 1292, 1299 (11th Cir. 1988). 
8 Dillard v. City of Greensboro, 213 F.3d 1347, 1353 (11th Cir. 2000). 
9 Id. 
10 See Cullens v. Ga. Dep’t of Transp., 29 F.2d 1489, 1494 (11th Cir. 1994). 



 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 5 of 8

consider “its own knowledge and experience concerning reasonable and proper fees and 

may  form  an  independent  judgment  either  with  or  without  the  aid  of  witnesses  as  to 

value.”11   

In  this  case,  Plaintiff  filed  his  complaint  in  Macon,  Georgia;  thus,  Macon  is  the 

appropriate legal community for the purpose of determining reasonable hourly rates.  The 

attorneys’  and  paralegal’s  hourly  rates  of  $150.00,  $125.00,  and  $85.00  per  hour, 

respectively, are reasonable in light of the prevailing market rate in Macon.   

Unfortunately,  the  Court  cannot  as  easily  determine  the  number  of  hours  each 

individual  expended  as  a  result of  Plaintiff’s  misconduct.    Rather  than  identifying  these 

specific  expenditures,  Defendant  requests  a  flat  fee  of  $3,867.50.    Having  reviewed  the 

attorneys’  affidavits  and  accompanying  invoices,  however,  the  Court  finds  Defendant  is 

entitled  to  $1,166.50  in  attorney’s  fees  under  Rule  37(b)(2)(C),  representing  a  total  of  8.9 

hours  of  legal  work  and  0.4  hours  of  paralegal  work.12    No  other  adjustments  are 

necessary.    The  Court  declines  to  award  $104.03  in  additional  costs  and  expenses; 

Defendant has not demonstrated how this expenditure relates to Plaintiff’s misconduct.   

I. Title VII, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e?5(k) 

Ordinarily,  a  prevailing  litigant  is  not  entitled  to  collect  attorney’s  fees  from  the 

                                                            
11 Loranger v. Stierheim, 10 F.3d 776, 781 (11th Cir. 1994) (internal quotation omitted). 
12 The Court’s calculations are outlined in detail in the Appendix to this Order.  See Coastal Fuels Mktg., Inc. v. 
Fla.  Express  Shipping  Co.,  207  F.3d  1247,  1252  (11th  Cir.  2000)  (stating  that  a  court  granting  an  award  of 
attorney’s fees should provide a summary table of how it arrived at the amount awarded).   



 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 6 of 8

opposing  party.13    However,  42  U.S.C.  §  2000e?5(k)  provides  that  the  Court,  “in  its 

discretion,  may  allow  the  prevailing  party  …  a  reasonable  attorney’s  fee  as  part  of  the 

costs”  of  a  Title  VII  action.    In  2001,  the  Supreme  Court  defined  the  term  “prevailing 

party”  for  purposes  of  fee?shifting  statutes  as  the  “party  in  whose  favor  a  judgment  is 

rendered, regardless of the damages award.”14  To qualify as “prevailing,” the party must 

be awarded some relief by a court, such as a judgment on the merits or a court?ordered 

consent  decree.15    Both  create  the  “material  alteration  of  the  legal  relationship  of  the 

parties” necessary for a fee award.16  Although the prevailing Title VII plaintiffs may be 

awarded attorney’s fees in “all but very unusual circumstances,”17 a prevailing defendant 

has  the  added  burden  of  proving  that  the  plaintiff’s  Title  VII  claim  was  “frivolous, 

unreasonable, or without foundation, even though not brought in subjective bad faith.”18   

Here,  the  Court  need  not  reach  the  question  of  whether  Plaintiff’s  Title  VII  claim 

was  frivolous,  unreasonable,  or  without  foundation  because  Defendant  has  not 

demonstrated  it  is  the  prevailing  party  for  purposes  of  42  U.S.C.  §  2000e?5(k).    Instead, 

Defendant merely assumes it qualifies for an award under this statute.  To the contrary, 
                                                            
13 Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. v. Wilderness Soc’y, 421 U.S. 240, 247 (1975). 
14  Buckhannon  Bd.  &  Care  Home,  Inc.  v.  W.  Va.  Dep’t  of  Health  &  Human  Servs.,  532  U.S.  598,  602?03  (2001), 
superseded by statute on other grounds, Open Government Act of 2007, Pub. L. No. 110?175, 121 Stat. 2524.  The 
Buckhannon  definition  was  specifically  established  to  apply  under  the  Fair  Housing  Amendments  Act,  42 
U.S.C. § 3613(c)(2), and the Americans with Disabilities Act, 42 U.S.C. § 12055.  However, the Supreme Court 
noted in dicta that the prevailing party provisions in certain other fee?shifting statutes should be interpreted 
consistently, and listed 42 U.S.C. § 2000e?5(k).  Id. at 602?03, n.4.   
15 Id. at 603 (internal quotation omitted). 
16 Id. at 604 (internal quotation omitted). 
17 Albemarle Paper Co. v. Moody, 422 U.S. 405, 415 (1975). 
18 Christiansburg Garment Co. v. EEOC, 434 U.S. 412, 421 (1978). 



 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 7 of 8

this case was dismissed without prejudice early in the course of litigation, and the Court 

did not address the merits of Plaintiff’s claims.19  Under these circumstances, the Court’s 

decision did not alter the parties’ legal relationship in any substantive way.20  Accordingly, 

Defendant cannot recover attorney’s fees under 42 U.S.C. § 2000e?5(k).   

CONCLUSION 

For the foregoing reasons, the Court hereby GRANTS IN PART AND DENIES IN 

PART  Defendant’s  Petition  for  Attorney’s  Fees  and  Costs  [Docs.  25  &  28].    Plaintiff  is 

HEREBY  ORDERED  to  pay  Defendant  an  award  of  $1,166.50  in  attorney’s  fees  as 

calculated in the Appendix to this Order.21    

SO ORDERED this 19th day of September, 2013. 

BBP/ssh 

S/  C. Ashley Royal 
C. ASHLEY ROYAL, CHIEF JUDGE 
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

 

 

 

 

                                                            
19 Order of Dismissal [Doc. 23]. 
20  See,  e.g.,  Hughs  v.  Lott,  350  F.3d  1157,  1161  (11th  Cir.  2003)  (“A  dismissal  without  prejudice  is  not  an 
adjudication  on  the  merits…”);  McRae  v.  Rollins  College,  No.  6:05cv1767Orl22KRS,  2006  WL  1320153,  at  *3 
(M.D. Fla. May 15, 2006) (“A dismissal without prejudice does not support a finding that a defendant was a 
prevailing party.”). 
21 See Coastal Fuels Mktg., Inc., 207 F.3d at 1252.   



 

Case 5:11-cv-00435-CAR Document 29 Filed 09/19/13 Page 8 of 8

Calculation of Attorney’s Fees 
 
Partner Richard Foster 

APPENDIX 

Correspondence re sanctions  
Report to Client re Show Cause Order 

 

6/19/12 
8/3/12 
 
 
 
 
 
Associate Andrea Alexander Guariglia 

Total Reasonable Hours 
 
Reasonable Rate 
 
 
Total Attorney Fees  

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

0.4 
0.4 

 

0.8 
$150.00 
$120.00 

0.5 
0.8 
0.1 
0.2 
0.2 
0.1 
0.6 
4.6 
0.7 
0.3 

8.1 
$125.00 
$1,012.50 

0.1 
0.3 

0.4 
$85.00 
$34.00 

$1,166.50 

 

Correspondence re failure to respond 
Research procedure & sanctions 
Communicate w/ Clerk re sanctions 
Communicate w/ Clerk re sanctions 
Communicate w/ insured re status 
Correspondence re Show Cause Order 
Prepare for Show Cause Hearing   
Travel to/from Macon for Hearing 
Appear for Hearing  
 
Communicate re: Hearing details  

 

 

Total Reasonable Hours 
 
Reasonable Rate 
 
Total Attorney Fees  
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Receipt & review of Show Cause Order   
 
Review file of case 

 

 

 

 

Total Reasonable Hours 
 
Reasonable Rate 
 
Total Paralegal Fees  
 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 


 
 
 

 

 

6/20/12 
7/19/12 
7/30/12 
8/2/12 
8/10/12 
 
8/16/12 
 
 
8/17/12 
 
 
 
 
 
Paralegal Cari Manton 

 
 
 

 
 

8/3/12 
8/13/12 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Fees Awarded: